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The University of Sydney

The University of Sydney is one of the oldest universities in Australia. Founded in 1850, it is Australia's oldest university and is regarded as one of the world's leading universities. We are proud to have assisted them with the translation of their Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Communication and Swallowing in Children diagnosed with Childhood Brain Tumour or Leukaemia.

The client

The University of Sydney is a public education institution in the city of Sydney which consistently ranks in the top 50 universities in the world. The University of Sydney hosts a large number of international students and focuses on diversity and inclusion, believing that their work is stronger because they value different and unique perspectives.

About the project

Industry Medical & Healthcare
Services Translation and independent checking
Languages Simplified and Traditional Chinese, Italian, Arabic and Vietnamese
Documents Booklets

The Challenge

The University of Sydney had recently completed published their Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Communication and Swallowing in Children diagnosed with Childhood Brain Tumour or Leukaemia (CBTL). The project was widely supported and funded, including by the Cancer Institute of NSW.

Child survivors of brain cancer and leukaemia often face new challenges during and after their cancer treatment is completed therefore these guidelines were developed to assist health professionals, survivors and parents of survivors. The research staff also wanted to make sure this information was available for the culturally and linguistically diverse community, and needed translators with expert medical knowledge to work on these documents.

The solution

We were eager to work with the University of Sydney and commenced by sourcing NAATI certified languages who were subject matter experts in the medical field. We then coordinated the translation and independent checking of the 10 page guideline summary into Simplified and Traditional Chinese, Arabic, Italian and Vietnamese, which are the most widely spoken languages other than English in New South Wales.

The results

The Ethnolink team are very proud of their work on this important project and together with The University of Sydney, have contributed to disseminating this information into multicultural community. The translation of this research means that language is not a barrier to benefitting from medical research and information for culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

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